News and Views

Collaboration with Rockhampton school launches trial to support agriculture’s leaders of tomorrow

virbac cattle

Global animal health company Virbac Australia’s new collaboration with The Rockhampton Grammar School has just launched, with a trial conducted at Belmont Research Station on Wednesday 21st August 2019.

Designed to assist Year 11 students in determining the impact of internal parasites and managing drench resistance in cattle, the school has been working with Virbac Australia to conduct a product evaluation trial testing different worm treatment methods.

The trial has involved administering and monitoring 200 head of cattle, split into four groups and treated with different products, before being monitored over the next 84 days. The results should demonstrate which products work best to keep down worm count and boost weight gain, with the data then being available for students to analyse and be assessed on as part of their Certificate 3 curriculum.

It’s envisaged that the project should help determine the importance and impact of worms in Central QLD. With drench resistance being a current hot topic for producers, this trial is designed to continue the conversation about cattle drench resistance, and further investigate whether north Australian producers should be concerned about worms in their cattle.

As Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball explains, “this is a unique working collaboration to support students in becoming industry experts and future leaders in Australia’s agricultural sector. We’re pleased to be able to highlight some of the key issues surrounding internal parasites for the students as well as hopefully shed light on best practice worm control practices for the wider region of central QLD.”

For Rockhampton student Henry Gray the trial has so far been a great opportunity to learn more about what’s becoming an increasingly important issue for QLD farmers. “This trial is important to the agricultural industry as it will help us improve our productivity and how we manage the resistance of worms and other parasites. I look forward to gaining more knowledge of controlling parasites so that I can implement new practices my own property to improve production.”

Student Sara Schottelius also spoke of her experience being part of the unique new collaboration: “I hope to gain new knowledge that I can take home to my own property to improve how we control parasites. This trial is important for the agricultural industry to help us gain new information about the best methods to combat key issues in cattle productivity.”

For additional information about the trial, contact Dr Matthew Ball at matthew.ball@virbac.com

Source: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd

Most Popular

ADVERTISEMENT

To Top