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STEM partnership to benefit students

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With 75 per cent of jobs in the emerging economy requiring critical thinking and problem-solving in science and technology, The STEM Learning Project will equip today’s students with skills for the future.

To help meet this challenge, the Western Australian Department of Education is involved in a three-year, $4 million partnership with the STEM Education Consortium, leading the project which Western Australian Education and Training Minister Sue Ellery today (May 9 2017) officially launched.

STEM combines the four disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

The project’s aim is to encourage students to develop inquiring minds, apply logical reasoning, and think in a more connected way.

The STEM Learning Project will develop new classroom resources to encourage students to find solutions to real-world problems, such as programmable robots for use in emergency situations.

The project supports teachers to boost STEM in schools with professional learning via face-to-face workshops, online and video-conferencing, and on-demand digital channels.

The first of these resources will be released in late 2017 with many more to follow from 2018.

“The Western Australian Government will focus on improving STEM education. An investment in STEM disciplines will support the diversification of the economy and is an investment in jobs of the future,” said Western Australian Education and Training Minister Sue Ellery.

“We need students to think creatively, and to understand how real world challenges can be addressed through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

“Employers are looking for people with problem-solving skills, creative, and critical thinking; this partnership is a key step in the right direction.”

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