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Young Australians expecting university offers

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Today(16 January 2019) marks the day many young Australians will receive their first round offers for university courses. Although this can be an exciting time for some, it can also be challenging for some if the outcome isn’t what they wanted. However, headspace reminds young people that there are many pathways they can take towards their work and study goals.

This time can bring up lots of questions about the future and next steps. If work and study is beginning to affect a young person’s mental health it is important for them to know that they can access professional support through their GP, their local headspace centre or eheadspace.

Adrienne Hazeldene, headspace Acting Manager Vocational Services outlines this below:

  1. “Firstly, it’s important to note that if a young person is struggling during this time then they should ask for help, through their family and personal networks as well as through appropriate services. There are a myriad of avenues young people can explore if they don’t receive a round one offer.”
  2. “We encourage young people to start researching their other preferences and options to reach their goals. During the excitement and stress of finishing school, it’s easy to set your mind on one course, so spending some time researching your other preferences might help to put you at ease. You might find that these courses are able to provide you with more opportunities than you thought.”
  3. “It’s important to remember that there are pathway options for all courses. Although you may not have received your first preference, there are ways into your desired course through completing other qualifications first or transferring between qualifications. Speaking to a careers advisor can help with figuring out your next move.”
  4. “Transitioning into work or further study can be extremely stressful for young people but headspace have developed a number of vocational services that provide young people with intensive support with a career specialist or mentor over the phone or online. These services can assist young people whose mental health may be impacted during their work or study journey.”

Source: headspace

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